Funded PhD Studentship on Indyref 2014

ARCHIVE AND NARRATIVE
IN THE 2014 SCOTTISH INDEPENDENCE REFERENDUM

AHRC COLLABORATIVE DOCTORAL PARTNERSHIP
(SCOTTISH CULTURAL HERITAGE CONSORTIUM)

Application deadline: 8 May 2017

The Faculty of Arts and Humanities is pleased to invite applications for this fully-funded AHRC PhD Studentship (fees and subsistence at current AHRC UK/EU rates). The studentship includes a 6-month placement at the National Library of Scotland.

The Studentship: 

The 2014 referendum on Scottish independence was clearly a major historic event. How will it enter the historical archive, and the stories told by future researchers and citizens about the meaning of ‘indyref’ 2014?

This PhD project will explore a series of questions and challenges related to the National Library of Scotland’s ‘Collecting the Referendum’ project, an ambitious two-year project to collect the documentary record of this event in a wide range of formats: print and digital, social media and websites, archives and moving image.

These questions include: 

  • To what extent, and via what practices, was the indyref ‘remembered’ even as it was being experienced? (That is, how did campaigners and commentators try to position 2014 within stories looking back on it from the future?)
  • How was the indyref collected (and made collectible) in the midst of the campaign?
  • How did its self-conscious ‘historic’ quality affect the way indyref 2014 was documented and recorded?
  • How will future researchers interpret records and narratives of 2014 which exhibit this self-conscious ‘historic’ quality, i.e. which seem to ‘memorialise’ indyref in advance?

The student’s doctoral work will investigate both the ‘how’ and ‘why’ of indyref collecting. It will examine how archives of the 2014 referendum are constructed and used (both physical and digital), and the various factors that shape how the makers and users of such collections view the narrative possibilities and complexities presented by their materials.

While the student will have freedom to shape the exact parameters of the project, it is likely to involve research into recent Scottish political history, archive studies and digital collecting. Some awareness of relevant cultural and narrative theory, and digital humanities research methods, is preferred but not required.

The PhD student will be jointly supervised by Dr Scott Hames at the University of Stirling and Dr Amy Todman at the National Library of Scotland, with input from a wider supervisory team including Dr Peter Lynch (Stirling; expert on Scottish politics and referendums) and Eilidh MacGlone (NLS web archivist). Collaboration with the Scottish Political Archive, based at the University of Stirling, is an additional dimension of the project, supported by our archivist Sarah Bromage.

At Stirling, the student will join a lively community of PhD students linked to the Stirling Centre for Scottish Studies. At the National Library of Scotland, he or she will have the opportunity to work closely with curators and web archivists, and gain valuable research and technical skills.

How to Apply: Applicants should have a good undergraduate qualification and a relevant Master’s degree in any related field of expertise. Experience of the following areas of study is particularly welcome: history, archive studies, politics, cultural theory, digital humanities, cultural studies, Scottish studies. You will have some experience of relevant research methods (but note that research training is a key part of the studentship).

NB the AHRC rules governing this scheme note that if a student does not have experience of formal postgraduate study, they may be eligible for a studentship only if they can demonstrate evidence of sustained experience beyond undergraduate degree level that is specifically relevant to their proposed research topic, and could be considered equivalent to Master’s studyApplicants in this category (i.e. without a Master’s qualification) should include with their application a 1-page statement outlining the ‘specifically relevant’ skills, experience and knowledge they have gained ‘beyond undergraduate degree level’, that ‘could be considered equivalent to Master’s study’.

For further details on eligibility criteria, including UK residency, applicants should check the AHRC website (http://www.ahrc.ac.uk/).

The application: Applicants should submit:

  • a summary curriculum vitae (max 2 pages)
  • an example of recent academic writing (e.g., MSc/MLitt chapter or undergraduate dissertation)
  • a short statement (1 page) outlining your qualification for the studentship, and initial thoughts on how you’d approach the project
  • the names and contact details of two academic referees

Submit your application via email to Dr Scott Hames (scott.hames@stir.ac.uk) and Dr Amy Todman (a.todman@nls.uk). Applications will close 8 May 2017 at 4pm. Please ensure your referees are able to provide (on request, via email) an academic reference by 19 May, 5pm.

As noted above, applicants without a Master’s qualification should submit an additional 1-page statement outlining their ‘specifically relevant’ skills, experience and knowledge that could be considered equivalent to Master’s study.

Interviews will be held on Tuesday 23 May at the University of Stirling.

Potential applicants are strongly encouraged to contact Dr Scott Hames (scott.hames@stir.ac.uk) and Dr Amy Todman (a.todman@nls.uk) for ‘further particulars’ of the project, or with informal queries.

James Hogg’s Unconventional National Tale

NEIL SYME

The Scottish Studies Research Group at Stirling has settled into a regular fortnightly routine, and the standard of presentations thus far is inspiringly high. At our last meeting on 1 June, Dr Barbara Leonardi presented a compelling paper based on an article that will see publication later this month in Studies in Scottish Literature, entitled ‘James Hogg’s The Brownie of Bodsbeck: An Unconventional National Tale’. On a personal level, having known her for about five years, it was nice to finally see Dr Leonardi present her work!

Barbara%27s Picture for Blog.1

Dr Barbara Leonardi

Barbara is an Early Career Researcher working on the Stirling/South Carolina Research Edition of the Collected Works of James Hogg, and her presentation argued that Hogg’s thematic choices in the short novel The Brownie of Bodsbeck work to subvert the traditional national tale. As Barbara explained, the conventional national tale follows Edmund Burke’s conception that the bourgeois family should form a neat and instructive representation of the nation, and in this case, the British Empire. In this conception, peasants and women are figured as the infants of Burke’s family-nation. Walter Scott notably employs this marriage plot in Waverley, as an ideological reconciliation of Scotland and England. In Barbara’s reading, Hogg challenges this paradigm through numerous subversive choices of theme, event and character. Brotherhood becomes a central trope in place of romantic love, with Katharine’s Lowland father forming a bond with a Highland soldier. At the same time, Katharine herself doesn’t engage in marriage with the potential ‘hero’ of the novel, and takes no lover, further disrupting the key symbolic relationship of the national tale. Katharine is the agent and moral locus of the text, helping the Covenanters and thus transgressing an unjust law in defence of human rights.

s048Barbara went on to discuss the dialogue of the text, analysing the apparent dichotomy between Catherine’s faultless English and her peasant background, and the broad Scots of her father. While some reviewers were uncomfortable with this clash of voices, in Barbara’s reading this amounts to a Bakhtinian approach to ‘multivocality’ through which Hogg rejects the centre/periphery division of the imperial ethos and suggests a new, inclusive Britishness based on the validity of working class, rather than bourgeois, ethical values. In this way, Katherine becomes ‘a meritorious symbol for the Scottish nation’, and further exemplifies the way Hogg was thinking ahead of his times. Barbara’s compelling paper will be accessible online after its publication later this month

Typically for these Scottish Studies Research Group meetings, the presentation provoked a lively informal discussion of Hogg, the national tale, covenanting history, publishing and editorial factors in relation to Hogg’s work, and the emasculation of an Episcopalian priest (this latter point occurs in the text)! These discussions have become a real high point of the group’s meetings, often ranging across disciplines (this week literature, publishing, history…) and giving a real sense of interconnectivity between researchers. If you’re working in the field of Scottish studies, no matter the stage of your research, at Stirling or elsewhere, please do come along to the next meeting or get in touch via email; discussions are informal, welcoming, and usually inspiring. The date of the next meeting is to be confirmed, but will be publicised via the Twitter account of the Centre for Scottish Studies (@stirscotstudies). We hope to see you there.

Scottishness in Early Sound Cinema, 1927-1933

ARIANNA INTRONA

Last Wednesday the Scottish Studies Research Group met for a fascinating presentation by PhD candidate John Ritchie on ‘Sir Harry Lauder and Will Fyffe: Being Scottish in Early Sound Cinema’. John’s talk was based on his wider research, which focuses on  how Scottishness is represented in films produced during the Transition to Sound period, from 1927 to 1933.
 Will Fyffe
John started by introducing the twin figures of Sir Henry “Harry” Lauder (1870 –1950) and Will Fyffe (1885 –1947). Both were music hall artists that became international stars in the first decades of the twentieth century, as suggested by how American tribute acts to the former preceded his arrival in the United States. John gave examples of how  Lauder and Fyffe were encouraged to record their music hall acts and stage routines for early sound films.

John then explored the performance of Scottishness as central to Lauder’s and Fyffe’s theatre practice. Although Lauder’s personification of Scottishness was more convincing, Fyffe’s too made a point of being identifiable as Scottish. In particular, costume and accent were used to signify Scottishness in music hall and sound film alike. Against a backdrop in which tartan costume became the signifier for nationality,the kilt was the most important element of the mise en scène. As for language, while Lauder’s voice came to represent Scottish language abroad, Fyffe too strove to realise Scottishness through language, but drawing on the east coast vernacular. The ways in which Lauder’s and Fyffe’s personification of Scottishness played to stereotype explains how the former could easily become a target of criticism for Hugh MacDiarmid, who resented  how Lauder’s (hugely popular) performances provided an inaccurate, simplistic and derogatory representation of Scotland.

Harry_Lauder_1922

Sir Harry Lauder

A very interesting interdisciplinary discussion was sparked by John’s presentation, in which we were able to discuss parallels between film critics’ take on Lauder, still influenced by MacDiarmid’s loathing of his performances, and literary critics’ approach to the Kailyard school of Scottish fiction, similarly informed by MacDiarmid’s caustic rejection. We also enjoyed learning more from John about the transition to sound film in Scotland and the state of archival resources around the topic, while hearing some fascinating anecdotes about his research journey and findings.

 

Our next meeting will take place on Wednesday the 1st of June, at 5pm, Room A7, Pathfoot Building. We will hear from Dr Barbara Leonardi, a post-doctoral researcher here at Stirling, about ‘James Hogg’s The Brownie of Bodsbeck; An Unconventional National Tale’. All members of the Stirling research community, as well as Scottish studies enthusiasts from beyond, are very welcome to attend.

 

Poetry & Song in Victorian Dundee

DUNCAN HOTCHKISS

The May Day bank holiday was the date for the second meeting of the Scottish Studies Research Group at Stirling, and fittingly we had the pleasure of listening to Erin Farley talk about her research on popular and working-class poetry and song in Victorian Dundee. The city is known for its pride in its political traditions, from radical and liberal nineteenth-century identities through to labour and working-class strains into the early twentieth-century – historical legacies which continue to inform popular political discourse in Dundee (and beyond). In a week which saw the Dandy photo-shopping its way into the Scottish political limelight, and Dundee United FC relegated by their city rivals Dundee FC, Pathfoot A7 took on a strong Dundonian flavour for the evening (alas, without any ‘pehs’).

dundee-logo

Erin opened by giving us some background to her research, undertaken in collaboration with Dundee Central Library and the University of Stirling. Her project is focused on a wide range of material – poetry, ballads, maps and photographs, newspaper stories, tales and songs – in the Lamb Collection in Dundee’s local history department. Over 450 boxes make up the collection which was left to the city by Alexander Crawford Lamb (1843-97), who was, in another nod to Dundee’s well-known political identities, the son of a Temperance hotelier. The poetry-enthusiast Lamb was later to become proprietor of his own hotel on Reform Street, which became a centre of writing and reading culture in the city.

Another important figure in the poetic and song cultures of Dundee was George Gilfillan (1813-1878), who championed working-class poetry in the city. Erin’s talk explored how the political content of these poems was conditioned by specific publishing environments, as Gilfillan would be reluctant to print anything that was deemed too radical or politically dangerous. In this model of poetic patronage, ‘untaught’ and ‘natural’ working-class poetic ability was encouraged so long as it pertained to Victorian narratives of moral improvement and respectability.

A major theme in Erin’s work is the significance of place in poetry and song, both in terms of content and as sites of performance and dissemination. Shops which printed and sold cheap broadsides were central to Dundee’s vibrant culture of poetry and song, and operated as focal points for the urban community and also for the rural communities of the surrounding countryside. At the changing of seasonal work patterns and during fair days, rural workers (usually young males) would come into the city and visit the broadside shops to pick up cheap songs and speeches to arm themselves with material for a busy day of (markedly in-Temperate) socialising. These local traditions found their way into the content of poems and songs, which Erin brought to life by playing an archive recording of a Dundee street song about a rural worker’s encounter with the city’s liquor trade, and a disastrous attempt at courting which found the young man awaken (alone) at the foot of a tenement close. The young man returned on foot to the countryside chagrined and vowing never to return to the city again, a nineteenth-century ‘walk of shame’ which, interestingly, placed the shame upon the spurned young man rather than upon the woman in the song.

Place was also significant in the political lives of poems and songs, a good example of this being the city’s Magdalen Green – the focal point for political protest in Victorian Dundee. The square’s topography lent itself to speeches and rallies, such as those held by Dundee weavers in the aftermath of the Peterloo massacre of 1819, to raise money for the families of those killed by the military in Manchester.

George Kinloch statue Dundee[4]

Statue of George Kinloch, Dundee

A local laird named George Kinloch made a speech at Dundee’s Peterloo rally which the authorities deemed rather too inflammatory, who then intended to exile Kinloch to Australia. Kinloch to France, returning to the city in 1832 to become Dundee’s first MP after the Reform Act, only to die shortly after. Kinloch’s place in Dundee’s popular political folklore was thus secured, and the poems and songs in the Lamb Collection attest to Kinloch and Magdalen Green’s symbolic centrality to the ongoing reform movements in the city.

Erin illuminated her presentation with numerous lively examples of Dundee’s Victorian poetry and song. The legacy of Burns was a strong theme to emerge, his songs being regularly re-worked to fit local issues. Erin finished with an engaging reading of one of Dundee’s most well known poets, James Young Geddes, who cast a doubtful eye upon the city’s pride in its radical traditions:

       Here are the people that sing “A man’s a man for a’ that”;

       Here are the people that shout “The rank is but the guinea’s stamp” —

       See how they are crane-ing their necks for honours. 

       See how avaricious they are for gew-gaws, how their souls are athirst for trumpery titles.

James Young Geddes, ‘The Glory has Departed’

A lively discussion followed Erin’s presentation, where we talked about the use of Scots and the Dundee dialect, and explored different aspects of gendered civic identities in the Dundee case and in other Scottish towns and cities. We hope to follow up this meeting by having a Scottish Studies Research Group day-trip to the City of Discovery, to find out from Desperate Dan himself what really happened with THAT Dandy picture with Nicola Sturgeon.

Our next meeting will take place on Wednesday the 18th of May, at 5pm, Room A7, where we will hear from second-year PhD candidate John Ritchie from the division of Communications, Media and Culture, and his research on “Sir Harry Lauder and Will Fyffe: Being Scottish in Early Sound Cinema”. We invite all members of the Stirling research community with an interest in Scottish topics to attend what promises to be another entertaining and stimulating Scottish Studies Research Group event.

 

 

New Scottish Studies Research Group

ERIN FARLEY

Last week saw the first meeting of the Stirling Scottish Studies Research Group – intended as a friendly space for people working on Scottish-related topics to share their research, ideas and questions. At each meeting, a Stirling researcher will give an informal talk on their recent work, followed by group discussion. We aim to become an interdisciplinary support network, where we can share skills and knowledge and keep up to date with each other’s work.

Our first speaker was my fellow first-year PhD candidate, Félix Flores Varona, whose work centres on the Cuban national hero, journalist, poet and political theorist José Martí, and his relationships with various Scottish writers. This research is part of a wider view of Martí’s relationship with the culture of the British Isles – Félix’s Masters thesis focused on Irish connections, and he will follow the Scottish research with a study of Martí’s English interests.

JoseMarti4_jpg

José Martí (1853-1895)

Though his name may be unfamiliar to Scottish literature researchers, Martí’s detailed writings detailing his visit to Abbotsford – as yet unpublished – have proved invaluable to scholars of Walter Scott. Martí was not the only cultural link between nineteenth-century Cuba and Scotland. As Félix explained, other Cuban writers had translated Scott and Stevenson, and worked Scottish historical legends into their writing – but Martí was particularly prolific in his journalism, translation and criticism of Scottish authors.

Among the many writers Martí discussed were Margaret Oliphant, Henry Drummond (local to Stirling), and Gorbals author Alan Pinkerton (born 1819.) Pinkerton’s authorship has been disputed – he was accused of using ghostwriters – and his role as the founder of spy agency the Pinkertons has overshadowed his literary reputation. Ironically, during the Cuban War of Independence, the United States government had Martí investigated – by the Pinkertons.

Jose-Marti stamp

Cuban stamp celebrating Martí, 1995

Martí is remembered as an all-round cultural figure: as well as his prolific journalism and political work, he is hailed as a key founder of modernism in Latin America. This range of roles and writing styles means that Félix is having to familiarise himself with a range of disciplines, shifting from literary criticism to theories of translation and histories of journalism. The necessity of cross-disciplinary research is familiar to most members of the research group, and the more experienced researchers were able to offer Félix guidance on how to go about this.

For our next meeting, which will take place on Monday 2 May, in Pathfoot A7 at 6pm, I will be talking about the early stages of my own research into popular poetry and song communities in nineteenth-century Dundee, work which has so far incorporated literary, historical and folklore methods. We invite all members of the Stirling research community with an interest in Scottish topics to attend, and we look forward to the future conversations this group may open up.